©Sally Arnold

No, Really it’s the End

Finesterre to Muxia
Monday 8 December

My Camino was over. I felt an overwhelming calmness. I would continue to Muxia, but I had already completed the task I had set out to do. This was my epilogue.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Early Morning. Finisterre.

I began early, it was a municipal albergue, and we had to be out by 8am. I crossed the road for coffee and breakfast, waiting for the sun to lighten my path. It was raining, but at least it wouldn’t be dark. Another 30km today, but there was no urgency. I was hoping I would catch up with my Dutch friend – he wasn’t in Finisterre and had walked ahead to Muxia – we still had that dinner date.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Ancient Cross, Finisterre.
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Galician Stone Grain Barn. Near Muxia

I skirted the coast road in the drizzle, stopping for some final pictures of Finisterre at an ancient cross. I was enjoying walking with the smell of the ocean; and later on, only occasional glimpses. The picturesque landscape was dotted with the Galician stone grain barns that had become a feature of this area. It surprised me how similar they are in structure to the wooden rice barns in Indonesia where I live. The mostly undulating path was kind to my feet, however I was getting hungry. There were not many stops along the way today, and when I saw a sign for a bar, took the rather long uphill detour. I was too early for the menu, but coffee and a sandwich would have to suffice.

I passed the Spanish woman who had shared her meal a couple of days ago, she was doing the reverse walk to me. She wished me “Buen Camino en la vida” and I gave her directions to the bar. Soon after, I received a message from my Dutch friend – he was in Muxia and was waiting to have dinner with me. His message put a spring in my step, and I was now keen to get out of the cold and damp elements.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
The Road to Misty Muxia.
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Sanctuario de Nuestra Señora de la Barca. Muxia.

Approaching Muxia speed signs along the road announce “Muxia 50” – I had just turned fifty, so decided this was the place for me. In the distance I could see the rocky fronted seaside town. It didn’t look very big, but on arrival it was some distance still to walk to the alburge where my friend was waiting. It was a pleasure to see him. The very hospitable host made me a cup of tea, and made me feel very welcome. We were the only guests. My friend had opted for a private room, so I had the large and comfortable dorm to myself ( for now). After a shower we walked to the headland to see the magnificent Sanctuario de Nuestra Señora de la Barca church, built on the ocean rocks. The waves crashed against the craggy cliff, the sea was wild. We sat mesmerised, watching for more than an hour. There were not the crowds of Finisterre, it was raw and untamed. I liked it, there is magic here. Back a little on the cliff, we saw the final Camino marker, this yellow arrow had no distance indicated, there was nowhere else to go. Nearby we spent some time taking cheesy photos of each other jumping in the “I’ve made it” fashion in front of the raging ocean.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
I Made It! Muxia.

Returning to the town, we finally had our dinner date, of sorts – it was a nice enough restaurant, but not really the splash out meal we had planned. Tomorrow we will go to the tourist office to collect our final Compostela – there is an additional one available for walking to Muxia. Then we would catch a taxi back to Santiago de Compostela. Yes, a taxi. I had a plane to catch. my walk was over. The End. But we know it isn’t.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s